Field Museum Photo Archives

Coffee Coffee Coffee! This looks like just the right amount of coffee to keep the photo archives going on National Coffee Day.
Not sure what you guys are going to drink though…
© The Field Museum, CSZ17946, Photographer Ned Dearborn.

Sacks of coffee beans. Coffee in Beneficio de Cafe.
Guatemala Zoology Birds, Mammals, fishes, reptiles Central America Guatemala Charles Melvin [C.M.] Barber Start Date: December, 1905 End Date: May, 1906
Album print 
5/1/1906

Coffee Coffee Coffee! This looks like just the right amount of coffee to keep the photo archives going on National Coffee Day.

Not sure what you guys are going to drink though…

© The Field Museum, CSZ17946, Photographer Ned Dearborn.

Sacks of coffee beans. Coffee in Beneficio de Cafe.

Guatemala Zoology Birds, Mammals, fishes, reptiles Central America Guatemala Charles Melvin [C.M.] Barber Start Date: December, 1905 End Date: May, 1906

Album print

5/1/1906

Fossil Friday, Fossil hunt. Here is one of our curators Elmer Riggs out on expedition in South America.
© The Field Museum, CSGEO69565, Photographer Elmer S. Riggs.
Elmer Riggs standing at the site of the Megatherium in plaster jacket, excavation includes fossils and bottles inside the cave.
South America, Argentina, Buenos Aires.
5x7 glass negative 
1927

Fossil Friday, Fossil hunt. Here is one of our curators Elmer Riggs out on expedition in South America.

© The Field Museum, CSGEO69565, Photographer Elmer S. Riggs.

Elmer Riggs standing at the site of the Megatherium in plaster jacket, excavation includes fossils and bottles inside the cave.

South America, Argentina, Buenos Aires.

5x7 glass negative

1927

Here is another plate from the Research Design in Nature series. In the late 20’s early 30’s there was a class at the Art Institute of Chicago that had its students come to the Field Museum to study and draw inspiration from our collections.
© The Field Museum, GN90798d_RDN076.
Black and white drawings of a Tern, Baby Gull, Kittiwake, and a series of Penguins along the bottom border. Research Design in Nature plate.
1929 

Here is another plate from the Research Design in Nature series. In the late 20’s early 30’s there was a class at the Art Institute of Chicago that had its students come to the Field Museum to study and draw inspiration from our collections.

© The Field Museum, GN90798d_RDN076.

Black and white drawings of a Tern, Baby Gull, Kittiwake, and a series of Penguins along the bottom border. Research Design in Nature plate.

1929 

Taxidermy Tuesday,Tamandua Anteater. They spend up to half of their time in the treetops, where they forage for arboreal ants and termites.
© The Field Museum, CSZ78245.

Tamandua, Anteater, mounted specimen from exhibit screen.
Specimen prepared for exhibition by Staff Taxidermist Arthur G. Rueckert, assisted by Frank C. Wonder.
Size:
8x10 negative 
1934 

Taxidermy Tuesday,Tamandua Anteater. They spend up to half of their time in the treetops, where they forage for arboreal ants and termites.

© The Field Museum, CSZ78245.

Tamandua, Anteater, mounted specimen from exhibit screen.

Specimen prepared for exhibition by Staff Taxidermist Arthur G. Rueckert, assisted by Frank C. Wonder.

Size:

8x10 negative

1934 

Mammal Monday, Anteater. All anteaters have elongated snouts equipped with a thin tongue that can be extended to a length greater than the length of the head; their tube-shaped mouths have lips but no teeth.
© The Field Museum, CSZ77644.
Anteater Skeleton. Zoology mounted skeletons.
8x10 negative
1933

Mammal Monday, Anteater. All anteaters have elongated snouts equipped with a thin tongue that can be extended to a length greater than the length of the head; their tube-shaped mouths have lips but no teeth.

© The Field Museum, CSZ77644.

Anteater Skeleton. Zoology mounted skeletons.

8x10 negative

1933

Roosevelts and The Field.
Over the past week many people have asked if the Field Museum has any connection to Teddy Roosevelt and the animals he collected.
Sadly we don’t have any of his specimens here, but in looking through some of our digitized Bulletins we came across a great story of how his two sons, Theodore Jr and Kermit, along with Charles Suydam Cutting (see image above), led an expedition in China to collect specimens.
"One of the most productive expeditions in the Museum’s History, the Kelley Roosevelts venture acquired a great varied collection of the vertebrate fauna of a little known part of the world. The total number of zoological specimens credited to the expedition was 15,397, of which 1,479 were mammals, 5,194 birds, 453 reptiles, 438 freshwater fishes, and 7,833 insects. In addition there were 2,400 sheets of plants."
You can see some of these collected specimens on display today in the Asian Hall of Mammals.

The Field Museum Library has been in the process of digitizing many of its own publications such as Fieldiana, and the Field Museum Bulletins and putting them on the BHL.

Roosevelts and The Field.

Over the past week many people have asked if the Field Museum has any connection to Teddy Roosevelt and the animals he collected.

Sadly we don’t have any of his specimens here, but in looking through some of our digitized Bulletins we came across a great story of how his two sons, Theodore Jr and Kermit, along with Charles Suydam Cutting (see image above), led an expedition in China to collect specimens.

"One of the most productive expeditions in the Museum’s History, the Kelley Roosevelts venture acquired a great varied collection of the vertebrate fauna of a little known part of the world. The total number of zoological specimens credited to the expedition was 15,397, of which 1,479 were mammals, 5,194 birds, 453 reptiles, 438 freshwater fishes, and 7,833 insects. In addition there were 2,400 sheets of plants."

You can see some of these collected specimens on display today in the Asian Hall of Mammals.

The Field Museum Library has been in the process of digitizing many of its own publications such as Fieldiana, and the Field Museum Bulletins and putting them on the BHL.

Have you ever wondered how the totem poles got into Stanley Field Hall?
A lot of man power and a widened door.
© The Field Museum, GN84599, Photographer Herbert P. Burtch.
Moving totem poles formerly located in the Field Columbian Museum. Railroad cars, flat bed trains. Over 22 men outside west side, moving totem poles inside the new Field Museum building.
1920

Have you ever wondered how the totem poles got into Stanley Field Hall?

A lot of man power and a widened door.

© The Field Museum, GN84599, Photographer Herbert P. Burtch.

Moving totem poles formerly located in the Field Columbian Museum. Railroad cars, flat bed trains. Over 22 men outside west side, moving totem poles inside the new Field Museum building.

1920